Grief, Children and Humanist Parenting

 

The quickest way through grief is to just experience it  - Jen Hancock HumanistGrief and Children

I am a Humanist parent and I am often asked about how to talk to a child about death without a) making a huge deal out of it, b) how to keep it in a natural as opposed to supernatural context and c) how to help a child cope with grief in the absence of supernatural comforting.

My son lost one of his grandfathers when he was 3 years old, so I had to deal with us way earlier than I was prepared for.  I have to admit, I choked for a few days and hesitated telling him. I knew I needed to but my husband had flown to TN to be with his mom and to help her with the funeral. I didn’t want to be alone with an inconsolable child. I was afraid.  It turns out I needn’t have been.

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10 Ways to Find Happiness as a Humanist

Have a plan for happiness  - without a goal to strive for, life becomes meaningless - Jen Hancock - Humanist10 Ways to Find Happiness

I was asked the other day for practical advice on how to find happiness in your life. I think often we get stuck on the idea that happiness is some grand thing, but really, finding happiness is a matter of paying attention to the little details in your life. Integrating your ethical values into how you do the little things will help you find more happiness throughout the day.  Anyway – here is my list of 10 simple things you can do to find more happiness in your life.


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False Dichotomy

It is easy to stereotype people who don’t agree with us, but it isn’t an accurate portrayal of what of who they really are - Jen Hancock - Humanist False Dichotomy (The Angry Atheist vs. The Accommodationist)

Caution – this is a movement rant:

For the record, I am sick of the debate between angry atheists and accommodationists.  If we haven’t figured it out already, this is a false dichotomy.  It is a convenient way to stereotype people who don’t agree with us, but it isn’t an accurate portrayal of what is really going on inside the atheist movement.


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