Responsibilities of a Citizen

Responsibilities of a Citizen

Next week is Election Day.  We will be voting on everything from President of the United States to US Senators and Representatives, state representatives, school board and county commissioners and a number of amendments to state constitutions.  In order to know what you are voting on and for whom you are voting, you have to take some time to do your research. This isn’t something you can cram for and do well on.

Either you know that you are voting for someone who will do their best or you don’t. And the only way to know that is to do your research. If you consider yourself an ethical person, you will take the responsibility of citizenship seriously and do your homework. Find out what people think both pro and con on both sides. And don’t just get your information from one biased source and think you are done. You aren’t.  You have a moral obligation to actually know what both sides of the debate are talking about and you have a moral obligation to fact check all your sources of information. Failure to do this is a failure of your responsibilities as a citizen.

If you want ethical politicians who will do their best to help everyone succeed, you need to be ethical yourself when it comes to your voting responsibilities. So spend the next week researching the candidates. Who is funding them. What have they said, what do the fact checkers say about what they said.  Don’t trust the opposing politician to tell you the truth about them.

What about the amendments you are considering. Find out who is for and who is against and again, find out what the fact checkers are saying. Do not vote ignorantly. Make it your responsibility to become a high information voter. Only then can you do more good than harm in the ballot box.